Sarissa Precision Ltd: Buildings for the Far East

I've never been big into terrain.

I am never going to make any (far too much like hard, and messy, work) and in the past it's always seemed like a waste of money that could be spent on more soldiers. 

That, however, was before I got my wargaming room back after its sabbatical as a kids playroom, and before I moved this website to Squarespace. I'm having more games now, and the photos are easier to process and upload, and my existing terrain...well, it just isn't up to scratch any more.

Wooden huts for the Eastern Front from 4ground

I have had very good experiences with 4Ground's range of wooden huts for the Eastern Front, so I thought I'd see if I could get some more of that sort of thing, but this time for the Far East. 

A quick search of the web, and I found Sarissa Precision Ltd: a UK company that do a nice little range of laser-cut wood buildings just like 4Ground's.

They have six different village huts in their Far East range, so I bought one of each, and have spent the last few days putting them together: I love the smell of laser-cut wood in the mornings!

Once built, however, I felt they were slightly lacking something. Not in the models themselves, I hasten to add, they were lovely, just that the setting demanded something more.

So I have been very brave, and I have pimped them up!

First I've added a toupee of wool roving (whatever that is!) bought from the local Hobbeycraft to their roofs. This was quite difficult: it involved smearing white glue over the roofs, then carefully snipping off and sticking down layers of wool cording so they look a bit like some kind of vegetation. Don't ask me what sort of vegetation: just enjoy the look!

It didn't turn out just how I wanted it too.

Building One: Planked Style Village House - Low

Apparently you're supposed to be able to comb this stuff, and I had envisioned a sort of green thatch effect...whereas what I have achieved is more Boris Johnson! But I like it, and I think it will look good on the tabletop amongst the plastic palm trees and lichen.

Next, I thought that the empty holes for every door and window (on some of the huts: others have a wooden lattice effect) looked a bit odd.

Building Two: Small Village House

So back to Hobbeycraft and the purchase of a roll of hemp trimming. From this I have made crude blinds/curtains which actually round things off nicely. Flocked bases and the odd shutter finish things off: at least until I can buy some little pots and other household detritus with which to decorate the bases.

So a little bit of work to make them look super, but highly, highly recommended. Oh, and they cost £52.50 for the six, with only £2.50 p&p.

Here are the other four:

Building Three: Woven Palm Style Village House - Low

Building Five: Planked Style Village House

Building Four: Woven Palm Style Village House

Building Six: Small Village House - Low

A Small Village Somewhere In The Far East

Bloody Burma Redux

Originally posted 26th November 2011

Transient

The next scenario pack updated for IABSM3 is "Bloody Burma". 

"Bloody Burma" contains an extensive history of the Japanese invasion of Burma in 1941/2, accompanied by twenty-four unique, company-level scenarios designed for “I Ain’t Been Shot, Mum!” but easily adaptable to other systems. It includes attacks, counter-attacks, encounter battles, fighting retreats, ambushes, and even an attempt to rescue POW’s!

“Bloody Burma” begins gently with a couple of infantry-only actions in the jungles of southern Burma, but rapidly progresses to full scale combined arms warfare (infantry, tanks, artillery and aircraft) on the plains and in the dense woods around Rangoon. Finally, the action moves to the high ground and river valleys to the north of Burma , as British, Indian and Chinese troops desperately try and hold off the rampaging Japanese for long enough to make their getaway!

Each scenario contains a background history, maps, a full game briefing, and a full briefing for each player. Simply print out the pages you need, unpack your figures, set up the table, and away you go! There's plenty of information given with each scenario, allowing easy conversion to other systems.

"Bloody Burma " contains the following scenarios: Operation Yacht; Kawkareik; Moulmein ; Paung; Kuzeik; Danyingon; The Yinon Road; Bilin; Pagoda Hill; Mokpalin; Payagyi; Pegu; Taukkyan; Pyuntaza; Henzada; Kyungon; Shwedaung; Kokkogwa; Myingun; Yenangyaung; Htuchaung; Kyaukse; Monywa; and Shwegyin.

Bloody Burma

Originally posted 20th November 2006

The "Bloody Burma" scenario pack is now available!

You’ll be Banzai-ing with the best of them again this Christmas with "Bloody Burma": Robert Avery ’s latest pdf scenario booklet for “I Ain’t Been Shot, Mum!”

"Bloody Burma" contains an extensive history of the Japanese invasion of Burma in 1941/2, accompanied by twenty-four unique, company-level scenarios designed for “I Ain’t Been Shot, Mum!” but easily adaptable to other systems. It includes attacks, counter-attacks, encounter battles, fighting retreats, ambushes, and even an attempt to rescue POW’s!

“Bloody Burma” begins gently with a couple of infantry-only actions in the jungles of southern Burma, but rapidly progresses to full scale combined arms warfare (infantry, tanks, artillery and aircraft) on the plains and in the dense woods around Rangoon. Finally, the action moves to the high ground and river valleys to the north of Burma, as British, Indian and Chinese troops desperately try and hold off the rampaging Japanese for long enough to make their getaway!

Each scenario contains a background history, maps, a full game briefing, and a full briefing for each player. Simply print out the pages you need, unpack your figures, set up the table, and away you go! There's plenty of information given with each scenario, allowing easy conversion to other systems.

"Bloody Burma " contains the following scenarios: Operation Yacht; Kawkareik; Moulmein ; Paung; Kuzeik; Danyingon; The Yinon Road; Bilin; Pagoda Hill; Mokpalin; Payagyi; Pegu; Taukkyan; Pyuntaza; Henzada; Kyungon; Shwedaung; Kokkogwa; Myingun; Yenangyaung; Htuchaung; Kyaukse; Monywa; and Shwegyin.